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Letter to Editor,

Where do we begin? That is the question asked, and it seems to be a good starting point when considering for whom we will cast a vote in the presidential election this November. We could consider the candidates themselves and their political websites; we could read the editorial section of The New York Times or the Wall Street Journal; we could even watch the debates between the candidates and then choose. We could do all these things or we could just start with what we think ought to be done and vote based on that.

That is where I will start. I have two non-negotiable litmus tests that a candidate must pass before I will even consider him (her) further. Since I am a Christian, my litmus test standard is that of the Lord’s. For a number of months now I have been writing to defend His standard when considering the sanctity of life and marriage; thus, I have a core set of beliefs. This is where I will start. I encourage others to do the same – have a core set of beliefs.

We can be pragmatic as one might think is suggested in last week’s editorial by Keith Stewart. The problem with pragmatism, when taken to its ultimate end, is that there is no such thing as objective truth or right and wrong – only that we need to be moderate and willing to compromise our core-set of beliefs. A pragmatist will deny such an ultimate end, but that is where it takes him. To be fair to Keith, I don’t think he affirmed a pragmatic course, only civility is discussion, with an openness to competing ideas.

In society we all are engaged in the “battle of ideas.” Each person thinks he and she are right concerning that particular idea. Let us engage in debate with regard to these ideas. Is there such a things as truth and, if so, what is that truth based on? Facts are truth, but is there truth of any other sort, such as moral truth? I have been arguing, and will continue to do so, that there is objective moral truth; that truth starts at the very foundation of man’s Creator: God.

Whether you are a Democrat, Republican, Independent, Libertarian, Socialist, or of the Green Party, let us engage in a conversation of ideas. For me, I refuse to be a partisan of political ideology. I will, however, engage in the debate as a partisan for the Lord’s way. To borrow the words of a well-known, but retired, football player, “I like that kind of party!”

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